Vaping e-cigarettes

Vaping at work

Vaping is seen as the acceptable face of smoking, but should employers sanction it at work?
Smoking cigarettes, pipes, cigars or herbal cigarettes in indoor work places has been banned since 1 July 2007, but e-cigarettes do not burn tobacco, so the law treats them the same way as nicotine patches, gums etc. Individual organisations can ban their use in the workplace if they wish, the same as banning alcohol, hot drinks or eating in the workplace. Read more

Health Surveillance

Health Surveillance

What exactly is health surveillance?

Health surveillance isn’t just an annual assessment, but an ongoing system of health checks for employees exposed to a specific hazard, e.g. noise, vibration, solvents etc.  Read more

Helping Great Britain Work Well campaign

The HSE has unveiled its new health and safety strategy with the emphasis on “health”. The “Helping Great Britain Work Well” strategy has been developed in a bid to ensure everyone in the workforce has a role to play in reducing the complexity of health at work.   The strategy is tailored around six themes – acting together, tackling ill health, managing risk well, supporting small employers, keeping pace with change and sharing success. Read more

sun exposure

The health risks of sun exposure

Thousands of people worldwide have been diagnosed with skin cancer due to working outside without protecting their skin.  In the most serious cases of malignant melanoma many people die, 60 per year in the UK alone. If you or your employees work out in the sun you have a legal duty to assess whether you or your employees are at risk of sun exposure. You can take action in lots of different ways –  Read more

Fit2Fit

The Importance of Health Surveillance

Liz Preston and Kerry Greenwood recently attended The Health & Safety Event in Birmingham.  It was brought to our attention that health surveillance is not taken up within companies as an important issue. Every year it costs billions of pounds to cover workers that are off work due to illness or injury. By keeping on top of your health surveillance this can easily be avoided. If your employees are affected by noise, vibration, dust, fumes or any other substances that are hazardous to health then it may be an idea to keep track of your employees health by using health surveillance questionnaires or by simple changes within the work place. To read more about health surveillance visit http://www.hse.gov.uk/health-surveillance/index.htm or call us to discuss any issues raised.

The Invisible Risks

Health risks do not seem to receive enough attention when it comes to managing the risk. This may be due to the fact that the consequences of exposure to some harmful agents are not often visible.

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When Glove Breaks Down

Gloves are a very good form of protection against chemical hazards, however when they fail this almost always leads to danger. It is important for anyone responsible for specifying gloves to understand the complex reasons gloves work and stop working.

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sun exposure

Sun Exposure and Skin Cancer

Practical guidance is available for protection while working in the sun, as outdoor workers could be at risk of developing skin cancer.

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Fit2Fit

Fit Testing for Respiratory Protective Equipment

Using Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) is the most practical means of ensuring that workers are protected from the effects of occupational respiratory diseases. However, if the RPE doesn’t fit the wearer correctly they are not being adequately protected, therefore they are still exposed to the hazards they believe they are protected from.

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Occupational Mental Health

Recently mental health and the psychosocial risks that can lead to stress has started to move up the health and safety agenda. Mental health isn’t considered the most obvious result of poor health and safety management compared to physical injuries. Some companies prefer to pretend it does not exist and view it as a personal or domestic issue rather than one that employers should address.

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