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RIDDOR

Do you know how to RIDDOR report?

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) reporting is a simple and straightforward procedure for any accident that needs to be reported to the HSE. The HSE have produced a guide on the RIDDOR Regulations, covering what needs to be reported, who should report the accident and how to go about it.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg453.pdf

Fit2Fit

Face Fit & Fit2Fit Testing

A study undertaken in 2010 by the Health & Safety Laboratory for the HSE showed that only half of the companies they surveyed were effective in providing adequate RPE that protected their employees.
It is a legal requirement that workers using tight fitting respiratory protective equipment (face pieces/masks) must be fit tested by a competent person. This requirement is detailed in Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations. Read more

Helping Great Britain Work Well campaign

The HSE has unveiled its new health and safety strategy with the emphasis on “health”. The “Helping Great Britain Work Well” strategy has been developed in a bid to ensure everyone in the workforce has a role to play in reducing the complexity of health at work.   The strategy is tailored around six themes – acting together, tackling ill health, managing risk well, supporting small employers, keeping pace with change and sharing success. Read more

Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (COMAH) Guidance

HSE is providing guidance for anyone who has duties under the COMAH Regulations 2015. The aim of the Regulations are to prevent and mitigate the effects on people and the environment of major accidents involving dangerous substances. An example of a major accident was the BP oil spill of 2010 on the Gulf of Mexico.

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COSHH Essentials

The HSE are providing COSHH Essentials which set out basic advice on what to do to control exposure to hazardous substances in the workplace.

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HSE Launch New Asbestos Campaign

HSE has launched a new campaign aimed at tradespeople, including construction workers, carpenters and painters and decorators, to give guidance on where asbestos is found and what to do and what not to do if it is found.

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Safe Digging Is Not Enough

It has been declared in front of around 125 construction leaders by Terry Morgan, Crossrail’s chairman; Paul Sheffield, Kier’s former chief executive; and Dennis Curran, Barhale’s executive chairman, that the amount of injury and damage occurring from working around underground services is unacceptable, unnecessary and cannot go on. They have launched a free-to-download “safe digging is not enough” toolkit to demonstrate their commitment to raising safety standards.

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The Construction Dust Partnership

The Construction Dust Partnership (CDP) was created by HSE due to an investigation showing that many construction workers were at a risk of developing diseases such as lung cancer, silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The partnership raises awareness and promotes the prevention of the health risks caused by construction dust.

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Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations

It is 25 years since the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations came info force.

Risk assessment has always been a cornerstone of COSHH, but one change which is often highlighted is the introduction of control banding – a technique used to guide the assessment and management of workplace risks. Maximum exposure limits and occupational exposure stands were also replaced with workplace exposure limits and the introduction of the principles of good practise as set out in Schedule 2A of the COSHH regulations.

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Regulation of Health & Safety at Work

HSE51 Regulation of Health and Safety at Work

The HSE and local authorities use a range and mixture of regulatory interventions to improve the management of health and safety risks. The document Regulation of health and safety at work explains the main features of their regulatory approach, including the interventions that they use. http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hse51.pdf