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Think about it…..what are your biggest frustrations and worries right now?

  1. Do you really have the Right People in the Right Jobs?
  2. Do you have the right Company Culture, including Positive Leadership & how is your reputation perceived locally?
  3. Do you waste hours of unnecessary time on people related admin?
  4. Do you have updated Company Plans & Strategy, Vision, Mission & Values?
  5. How does your Company Branding reflect you as a business?
  6. Do you really know where all your people’s personal information is kept & is it GDPR compliant?
  7. Are your people generally Happy, Motivated & Productive & do you have Strong Teams?
  8. Do you manage Performance effectively?
  9. Do you focus on Positive Employee Engagement initiatives?
  10. Do you have an effective Onboarding Process?
  11. Do you regularly benchmark hourly rates/salaries & pay above to remain competitive?

Some common examples of Client Pains;

  • CEO/Business Owners/MD’s unsure how to ‘Lead’ in a less directive & dated way
  • Not having the Right People in the Right Jobs
  • Lack of streamlined Processes & Company documents
  • Unable to Communicate effectively
  • Incapable or Untrained managers creating employee relations issues & grievances
  • No performance management or training/development
  • No People Management ‘self-service’ proactive software & not finding employee’s information easily
  • Poor recruitment & retention of staff
  • Unhappy &/or demotivated staff
  • No clear salary structure & poor pay &/or benefits
  • Poor Marketing

Are you clear on what steps to take as a business if facing a tribunal, unfair dismissal, constructive dismissal or whistleblowing claim?  

We have the experience and knowledge to reduce risk and save you time and money by solving these problems.

The latest HSE statistics reveal some interesting points that highlight the state of health and safety in the UK, between 2020 and 2021

2020/21 has firmly rooted health and safety in our day-to-day lives and our cultural consciousness. However, the latest statistics from the HSE prove we still have a long way to go. Simon Walter, Co-Director at Rhino Safety, shares his thoughts on what the focus should be in 2022.

 

  • Work-related ill-health cases increased from 1.6 million to 1.7 million
  • New cases of work-related ill health rose from 638,000 to 850,000, a 33% increase
  • The number of workers suffering from a new case of work-related stress, anxiety and depression rose by 30%, from 347,000 to 451,000
  • The major cause of new and long-standing cases of work-related ill-health is stress, depression and anxiety, which accounts for an astonishing 50% of cases
  • Musculoskeletal issues are next at 28%, while other types of illnesses account for 22%, Workers suffering from a new case of work-related musculoskeletal disorder rose by 6.5% from 152,000 to 162,000
  • Workers who sustained non-fatal injuries (self-reported) decreased by 36%. Non-fatal injuries reported by employers also fell by 22%
  • The major cause of non-fatal injuries across all industries is slips, trips and falls. In 2019/20 it accounted for 29% of incidents. In 2020/21 it rose to 33%
  • Fatal injuries at work rose from 111 in 2019/20 to 142 in 2020/21. The major cause of fatal injuries is falling from height, which is consistent with previous years
  • Over half of fatal injuries to workers in 2020/21 were in agriculture, forestry and fishing (34%) and construction sectors (39%)

Looking at these statistics, there’s a lot to reflect on. Among them are things we can do in 2022 to ensure that health and safety remain at the forefront of policy and strategy across a wide range of industries and sectors.

So – what are the key things we should focus on to move the dial on health and safety in 2022?

1. Keep health and safety in focus

2. Prioritise and incorporate mental health and wellbeing into health and safety practice/policies etc

3. Reduce the threat of musculoskeletal disorders across multiple industries

Read what the latest Public Health guidance means for your business

The guidance appears therefore to be quite confusing. On the one hand COVID safety measures are no longer required for the majority of businesses, but on the other the guidance to self-isolate has been significantly widened. This leaves employers in a real bind as to what to do and leaves open the ongoing significant interruption to business that periods of self-isolation create. Employers will need to give thought to what, if any, other protective measures (such as screens and sanitiser) they wish to retain should they wish to insist on those suffering from a respiratory illness coming to work.

What to do if a member of staff has symptoms of a respiratory infection, including COVID-19

If a member of staff is unwell with symptoms of a respiratory infection, such as COVID-19, they should follow the guidance for people with symptoms of a respiratory infection such as COVID-19.

Employers, in accordance with their legal obligations, may wish to consider how best to support and enable their workforce to follow this guidance as far as possible.

Management of members of staff who are at risk of serious illness from COVID-19

Some workers are at a greater risk of serious illness from COVID-19, for example people who have a weakened immune system.

There is specific guidance for people whose immune system means that they are at higher risk, because they have a reduced ability to fight infections, such as COVID-19. Employers may wish to consider the needs of employees at greater risk from COVID-19, including those whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19.

It is unclear whether there will be any specific updates to the Living with COVID plan but pulling together the various strands we now know:

 

The guidance is to be updated monthly and we will have to see what impact the loss of free mass testing and the updated self-isolation requirements will have.

Businesses and other organisations

Businesses and other organisations – Covid Update

Employers and businesses have taken significant steps over the pandemic to mitigate the risks of COVID-19 within their settings. The Government has lifted the majority of legal requirements on businesses, and continues to provide ‘Working Safely’ guidance setting out the steps that employers can take to reduce risk in their workplaces.

From 24 February, workers will not be legally obliged to tell their employers when they are required to self-isolate. Employers and workers should follow Government guidance for those with COVID-19 which will be to still stay at home if you are unwell and to take a test

From 1 April, the Government will remove the health and safety requirement for every employer to explicitly consider COVID-19 in their risk assessments. The intention is to empower businesses to take responsibility for implementing mitigations that are appropriate for their circumstances. Employers that specifically work with COVID-19, such as laboratories, must continue to undertake a risk assessment that considers COVID-19.

From 1 April, the Government will replace the existing set of ‘Working Safely’ guidance with new public health guidance. Employers should continue to consider the needs of employees at greater risk from COVID-19, including those whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19. The Government will consult with employers and businesses to ensure guidance continues to support them to manage the risk of COVID-19 in workplaces.

Employers should ensure that areas of the workplace that are poorly ventilated have airflow improved – research done shows good ventilation can reduce transmission of viruses by up to 70%.

FROM 1ST APRIL 2022

  • The Government will announce guidance that sets out the ongoing steps anyone with Covid-19 should take to minimise contact with others
  • The Government will no longer provide free LFT for the public in England
  • Tests will still be available to anyone who wishes to buy them privately through local chemists
  • Some free testing will still be applicable to social care employees and certain at-risk people, more details will follow closer to the time
  • The current requirement for some venues to require the Covid NHS pass will end
  • The H&S requirement for employers to have Covid-19 in their risk assessment will be removed
  • The existing ‘Working Safely Guidance’ will be replaced with new public health guidance

More guidance will be published in April for employers, on how to deal with employees who are at high risk of serious illness from Covid-19, even if they are vaccinated

Coronavirus: how to stay safe and help prevent the spread – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)Working safely during coronavirus (COVID-19) – Guidance – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

1. 2022 Employment Law Changes: Rate Changes

The 2022 employment law changes will include the usual set of rate changes and these will take effect in April 2022. They include the following:-

The National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage

Statutory Maternity Pay, Statutory Paternity Pay, Shared Parental Pay, Adoption Pay, Maternity Allowance, and Statutory Parental Bereavement Pay

NI contributions 1.25% increase from April 2022. (Coming soon in 2023 it will be separate tax on earned income and should be detailed on a payslip as Health & Social Care Levy).

Statutory Sick Pay

The statutory cap on a week’s pay for the purposes of calculating the basic award and statutory redundancy pay

2. Gender Pay Gap Reporting

Since 2017 employers who have a headcount of 250 or more must comply with regulations on gender pay gap reporting. The deadline for gender pay gap reporting by public sector employers, private sector employers, and voluntary organisations in 2021 was put back until midnight on the 4th October 2021. However, in terms of 2022, the deadlines are anticipated to revert back to the normal timescales. Accordingly, the deadline for public sector employers to report their data is likely to be the 30th March 2022. And for private sector employers and voluntary organisations, the deadline is likely to be the 4th April 2022.

3. Employment Bill

A much anticipated part of the 2022 employment law changes is the Employment Bill, although there is no guarantee that one will appear. If it does, then it is likely to include the following measures:-

  • The establishment of a new single enforcement body for employment rights.
  • The extension of protection against redundancy re pregnancy, maternity, adoption, and shared parental leave, including extending redundancy protection to six months post return to work after the end of maternity leave, with similar protection afforded to those returning to work from adoption leave and shared parental leave
  • Neonatal leave and pay
  • A new right to 1 week’s unpaid leave per year for carers
  • (already reviewed) New legislation to ensure that tips left by customers in restaurants are retained by staff in full, and are not either partially or wholly taken off them by their employers.
  • A new right for workers to request a more stable contract after 26 weeks service
  • (already reviewed) New legislation to enhance flexible working rights
  • An extension of time required to break a period of continuous service from one week to four weeks
  • New legislation making it compulsory for organisations to publish their modern slavery statements on a new government-run registry

Other possible measures which may appear in any Employment Bill as part of the 2022 employment law changes include:-

  • New legislation relating to post-termination non-compete clauses, over which the Government is currently consulting on
  • An extension of the ban on exclusivity clauses beyond zero hours contracts, to contracts where the workers’ guaranteed weekly income is less than the Lower Earnings Limit of £120 a week, which the Government is also currently consulting on
  • Compensation for those whose shifts are cancelled at short notice, an entitlement to reasonable notice of allocated shifts, and protections for those who refuse last minute shifts
  • New legislation to protect against “firing and rehiring”

4. Other 2022 employment law changes include the following:-

April 2022 – regulatory reforms for trade unions and employers’ associations will be introduced under which “new enforcement powers and levy mechanism will bring the Certification Officer into line with other regulators like the Pensions Regulator.“

Why Bother ?

Contract of Employment 

As well as being common sense, it is a legal requirement to record the main terms of an employment contract in writing. You need to provide employees and workers with a written statement of employment particulars by their first day of work. This should set out key terms of employment, such as pay, hours, holiday, place of work and notice. Any changes made to the information provided in the written statement, such as an agreed reduction in hours, must be confirmed to the individual in writing within one month of the change.

The employer will be ordered to pay the employee two weeks’ pay (subject to the statutory cap on a week’s pay) or, if it is just and equitable in the circumstances, a higher amount of four weeks’ pay (subject to the statutory cap). If there are exceptional circumstances where it would be unjust and inequitable to make an award against the employer, none will be made.

If you don’t do this, the employee can make a claim at an employment tribunal where compensation of 2 or 4 week’s pay may be awarded;

Company up to date Policies, Procedures & Staff Handbook

Why is it important to implement these documents and keep them up to date?

Policies provide a positive framework and structure for a business. Policies are important in a workplace as it helps reinforce and clarify the standards expected of employees and help employers manage staff more effectively as it defines what is acceptable and unacceptable in the workplace.

  • They set Expectations – Policies and procedures allow an employer to commit to writing the company’s values and mission.  They also set standards of behaviour, conduct and performance for employees;
  • Keep management accountable – This provides guidance to managers for how they are to conduct themselves and the standards they will be held to, but also provides transparency to the rest of the workforce as they can see the standards expected of their leaders and what they can in turn expect from their managers;
  • Ensure compliance with the law – Policies and procedures that are regularly reviewed and updated will assist a company in meeting its obligations at law;
  • Let employees know where to turn for help – Finally, policies and procedures let employees know where they can turn to for help.  All policies should have a point of contact for queries relating to that policy so employees know who they can contact with questions.

Did you know you can also attach your Company Documents to Our Craven HR Software to streamline your processes and make it easier for Your people 

Craven HR Software – Online HR System

Another Great Blog here 

Why do you need HR as an SME or Start Up?

Isolation Period Cut from 10 Days to 7 Days 

Fully vaccinated Covid sufferers can now cut their 10-day isolation period to seven days, it has been announced.

Under new rules, people in England can take two lateral flow tests 24 hours apart on day six and seven of their quarantine.

Self-isolation for COVID-19 cases reduced from 10 to 7 days following negative LFD tests – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Temporary change to Fit-notes

For Statutory Sick Pay (SSP), where employees go off sick on or after 10 December 2021, employers can only ask employees for proof of sickness (such as a fit note) after 28 days of sickness (including non-working days). Proof of sickness cannot be requested earlier than 28 days.
Fit notes do not have to be provided for DWP benefit claims until 27 January. This will not affect claims to benefit.
These changes are to give GP’s more time to work on the Coronavirus (Covid-19) booster programme.

Claim back Statutory Sick Pay paid to your employees due to coronavirus (COVID-19)

This scheme will be reintroduced from mid-January 2022. Further guidance will be available as soon as possible.

Claim back Statutory Sick Pay paid to your employees due to coronavirus (COVID-19) – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Whether your business has continued with home working or been on hold, as you consider returning to the office, there are some things you need to think about. Health and Safety being one of them.

The latest government advice can be found here https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

The latest HSE advice can be found here https://www.hse.gov.uk/news/coronavirus.htm

Read more

There can be no question that safety boots are an essential part of PPE which no engineer, or anyone working on a building site or refurbishment project should be without. However, what is open to question is the level of protection your feet need and whether in fact the sheer amount and range of safety footwear available is truly necessary. Read more